The Infinite And The Unknowable

Ultimae records

DANIEL THOMAS FREEMAN | The Infinite And The Unknowable – CD Book
DANIEL THOMAS FREEMAN | The Infinite And The Unknowable - CD BookDANIEL THOMAS FREEMAN | The Infinite And The Unknowable - CD BookDANIEL THOMAS FREEMAN | The Infinite And The Unknowable - CD BookDANIEL THOMAS FREEMAN | The Infinite And The Unknowable - CD Book

The Infinite And The Unknowable

DANIEL THOMAS FREEMAN
Format:

14.50 €

In stock

Product Description

A 12-track, 68-minute CD of instrumental music with a 48-page, softcover, 210 x 148mm book of 12 poems and 25 black and white photographs printed on 130gsm coated silk-finish paper with a 350gsm cover.

Gong choirs, ragged system violins, rusted electronics, liquid heave resonances, apocalyptic poetry, high-contrast photography: The Infinite And The Unknowable is a visceral attempt to explore the fathomless mysteries of the divine. Using a mythical Ballardian sea voyage at its core, it evokes such diverse sources as Andrei Tarkovsky, Arvo Pärt, Tim Hecker, ‘A Book of Silence’, John Luther Adams, Terrence Malick, ‘Under the Skin’, Jon Hassell, ‘Selected Ambient Works, Vol. II’, Laurie Spiegel, Ansel Adams, Richard Skelton, the books of Revelation, Job and Daniel, Swans, John Sheppard and Hieronymus Bosch.

The Infinite And The Unknowable was painstakingly constructed over a six year period from hundreds of layers of played and heavily processed electric violin, percussion and electronics and it includes the final re-worked version of the title track originally used in the devastating closing scenes of the Film 4 / BFI / STUDIOCANAL feature film ‘Catch Me Daddy’. The voice of this instrumental music has been extended by the accompanying debut collection of poetry and photography.

Music written, performed, engineered, produced, edited, mixed and mastered between 2011 and 2016 in England by Daniel Thomas Freeman.
Poems and photographs written, shot, edited and designed between 2009 and 2016 in England, Scotland and Wales by Daniel Thomas Freeman except for the beach photo by David Freeman in the early 1970s.